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October 17, 2017  |  Login
Baby-Safe Bottles
By Dr. Alan Greene
 

When shopping for baby bottles, look for products made of glass, poly­ethy­lene, or polypropylene. Polycarbonate bottles (about 95 percent of the bottles on the market) can leach BPA, a hormone disruptor that acts like human estrogen. Even tiny amounts of this have been associated with health problems such as early puberty, hyperactivity, and decreased sperm count. I do not recommend using any polycarbonate products for babies.

  • The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP, http://www.iatp.org) says bottles made of milky, soft, translucent plastic usually contain no polycarbonates.
  • Highly rated bottles by the Ethical Consumer include Born Free (www .newbornfree.com), which are guaranteed to be free of BPA (I like the air vent in these bottles as well) and the Medela Breastmilk Storage and Feeding set, which is made from polypropylene. Find it at http://www.target.com and other stores
  • Glass bottles do not contain the same potentially harmful chemicals as plastic bottles. Evenflo glass bottles are recommended by the IATP and are available online at http://www.babysupermall.com.

  • Replace the conventional rubber or latex bottle nipples that come with some plastic and glass baby bottles with a nontoxic, clear silicone variety. (Conventional nipples may contain cancer-causing nitrosamines.) Evenflo and Circo both make silicone nipples, sold separately from their bottles.
  • Quick tip: Remember when shopping for plastic items for babies, including bottles and pacifiers, check the recycling symbol. Products numbered 3, 6, and 7 may contain harmful chemicals, whereas 1, 2, 4, and 5 may be safer.

Baby Safe Cans?

A 2007 analysis by the Environmental Working Group found BPA in 33 per­cent of the cans of concentrated soy- and milk-based infant formulas tested. BPA is in the plastics and epoxy resins that line some food cans, and can leach into the liquid formula. I strongly prefer powdered formulas until BPA is no longer allowed in the cans.1

 

 

 

 
REFERENCES :
1. “Bisphenol A: Toxic Plastics Chemical in Canned Food.” Environmental Working Group. Mar. 2007.
 

 

 
 
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